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What are 4 figure grid references? Made SIMPLE

    Are you wondering what 4 figure grid references are and how we use them? Then you have come to the right place! In this article I will explain what 4 figure grid references are, show you how to use them and answering common FAQs on this topic. Ready to learn more? Read on…

    What are 4 figure grid references?

    When navigating using maps, it’s important to be able to accurately locate your position on the map. One of the most common methods of doing this is by using 4 figure grid references. Grid references divide a map into a series of squares, making it easier to pinpoint your location. In this article, we’ll focus on 4 figure grid references, which are widely used and easy to understand.

    4 figure grid references

    What is the grid system?

    The grid system is a system of lines that are drawn on top of a map to help locate points on the map. The lines are usually drawn at right angles to each other, creating a series of squares that cover the entire map. The size of the squares can vary depending on the scale of the map, but each square has a unique identifier that helps to locate it on the map.

    The lines that run horizontally along the top and bottom edges of the map are called Eastings, while the lines that run vertically along the sides of the map are called Northings. Eastings are labeled with numbers, while Northings are labeled with letters. Together, the Eastings and Northings create a coordinate system that can be used to locate any point on the map.

    The Eastings and Northings are typically numbered or lettered starting from the bottom-left corner of the map and increasing towards the top-right corner. This means that the Eastings increase from left to right, while the Northings increase from bottom to top.

    For example, a map might have Eastings labeled with numbers from 0 to 99, and Northings labeled with letters from A to Z. The bottom-left corner of the map would be labeled 0A, while the top-right corner would be labeled 99Z. Each square on the map is given a unique identifier based on its location in the grid system.

    4 figure grid references

    How to Read 4 Figure Grid References

    Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to read 4-figure grid references:

    1. Locate the grid lines: First, locate the grid lines on the map. The grid lines will be drawn in a series of squares, with each square having a unique identifier consisting of an Easting (number) and a Northing (letter).
    2. Identify the 4-figure grid reference: Look at the bottom left corner of the square you are trying to identify. This will give you the Easting and Northing for the square. For example, if the bottom left corner of the square is labeled as 20F, the 4-figure grid reference for that square would be 2020.
    3. Determine the location: Once you have the 4-figure grid reference, you can determine the location of the square on the map. Each square on the map will have a unique 4-figure grid reference, and knowing the grid reference will allow you to find the square you are looking for.
    4. Practice: The more you practice reading 4-figure grid references, the easier it will become. Look for features on the map that have been given a 4-figure grid reference, and use those references to find the location on the map.

    Reading 4-figure grid references involves locating the grid lines on a map, identifying the 4-figure grid reference for the square you are interested in, and using that reference to determine the location on the map. With practice, reading 4-figure grid references becomes easier and more intuitive.

    Examples and Practice Exercises

    Here are some examples and practice exercises to help you improve your skills in reading 4-figure grid references:

    Example 1: On a map, the bottom-left corner of a square is labeled 23C. What is the 4-figure grid reference for this square?

    Answer: The 4-figure grid reference for this square is 2323. The first two digits represent the Easting (23), and the last two digits represent the Northing (23).

    Example 2: On a map, the bottom-left corner of a square is labeled 16G. What is the 4-figure grid reference for the square to the right of this one?

    Answer: To find the 4-figure grid reference for the square to the right, you need to add 1 to the Easting value. The 4-figure grid reference for the square to the right of this one is 1716 (17 for the Easting, and 16 for the Northing).

    Practice Exercise 1: On a map, the bottom-left corner of a square is labeled 35F. What is the 4-figure grid reference for this square?

    Practice Exercise 2: On a map, the bottom-left corner of a square is labeled 27H. What is the 4-figure grid reference for the square above this one?

    Practice Exercise 3: On a map, the bottom-left corner of a square is labeled 12B. What is the 4-figure grid reference for the square to the left of this one?

    Answers: Practice Exercise 1: The 4-figure grid reference for this square is 3535. Practice Exercise 2: The 4-figure grid reference for the square above this one is 2728 (27 for the Easting, and 28 for the Northing). Practice Exercise 3: The 4-figure grid reference for the square to the left of this one is 1112 (11 for the Easting, and 12 for the Northing).

    4 figure grid references

    Other Types of Grid References

    In addition to 4-figure grid references, there are also other types of grid references that are commonly used in maps. Here are some of the most common types of grid references:

    1. 6-figure grid references: These are more precise than 4-figure grid references and are used when a more accurate location is needed. 6-figure grid references include both an Easting and Northing value, each with 3 digits. For example, a 6-figure grid reference might be 123456.
    2. 8-figure grid references: These are even more precise than 6-figure grid references and include both an Easting and Northing value, each with 4 digits. They are used when an extremely accurate location is required. For example, an 8-figure grid reference might be 12345678.
    3. National Grid References (NGR): These are used in the United Kingdom and are based on a national grid system that covers the entire country. National grid references use a combination of letters and numbers to identify a square on the grid, followed by either a 6-figure or 10-figure grid reference. For example, a national grid reference might be SK123456 or SK12345678.
    4. Military Grid Reference System (MGRS): This is a system used by the military to identify locations on a map. It uses a combination of numbers and letters to identify a location with high precision. MGRS grid references include both an Easting and Northing value, each with 5 digits. For example, an MGRS grid reference might be 12345 67890.

    These different types of grid references are all designed to provide a more precise location than a simple place name or address. By using a grid reference, it is possible to pinpoint a location with a high degree of accuracy, which can be very useful in a variety of contexts.

    FAQs About 4 Figure Grid References

    Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about 4 figure grid references:

    Why are grid references important?

    Grid references are important because they provide a precise way to identify a location on a map. This can be very useful for navigation, surveying, and a variety of other purposes.

    What is the difference between a 4-figure and a 6-figure grid reference?

    4-figure grid references provides a general location within a square on a map, while a 6-figure grid reference provides a more specific location within that square. A 6-figure grid reference includes both an Easting and a Northing value, each with 3 digits.

    How do I find the 4 figure grid reference for a location on a map?

    To find the grid reference for a location on a map, you need to locate the square that contains the location and then read the grid reference for that square. For a 4-figure grid reference, this will include two digits for the Easting and two digits for the Northing.

    What is a national grid reference?

    A national grid reference is a system used in the United Kingdom to identify locations on a map. It uses a combination of letters and numbers to identify a square on the grid, followed by either a 6-figure or 10-figure grid reference.

    How do I convert a 6-figure grid reference to a 4-figure grid reference?

    To convert a 6-figure grid reference to a 4-figure grid reference, you need to round the Easting and Northing values to the nearest 100. For example, a 6-figure grid reference of 123456 would be rounded to 1245 for the 4-figure grid reference.

    What is the military grid reference system?

    The military grid reference system (MGRS) is a system used by the military to identify locations on a map. It uses a combination of numbers and letters to identify a location with high precision.

    Can 4 figure grid references be used to navigate in the wilderness?

    Yes, 4 figure grid references can be used to navigate in the wilderness if you have a map that includes grid references and a compass or GPS device to help you find your location on the map. However, it is important to have the skills and knowledge needed to navigate safely in the wilderness before attempting to use grid references for navigation.

    4 Figure Grid ReferencesP: Key Takeaways

    Lets finish up this article about 4 figure grid references by summarising the key points. Here are 10 key takeaways about 4 figure grid references:

    1. Grid references provide a precise way to identify a location on a map.
    2. A 4-figure grid reference provides a general location within a square on a map, while a 6-figure grid reference provides a more specific location within that square.
    3. To read a 4-figure grid reference, you need to identify the square on the map and then read the Easting and Northing values for that square.
    4. To read a 6-figure grid reference, you need to identify the square on the map and then read the 3-digit Easting and Northing values for that square.
    5. National grid references are used in the United Kingdom to identify locations on a map.
    6. The military grid reference system is a precise system used by the military to identify locations on a map.
    7. Converting a 6-figure grid reference to a 4-figure grid reference involves rounding the Easting and Northing values to the nearest 100.
    8. Practice exercises can help improve your ability to read and use grid references.
    9. Other types of grid references include the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) system and the World Geographic Reference System (GEOREF).
    10. Understanding how to read and use grid references can be a useful skill for navigation, surveying, and other activities that require precise location identification.

    4 Figure Grid References: To Conclude

    Now you will hopefully feel a bit more confident using 4 figure grid references. If you enjoyed this article, I am sure you will love these too: