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12 smallest deserts of the world + fascinating facts

    The smallest deserts of the world are important parts of our landscape. They may not be the biggest in size or the driest deserts, but they are very interesting. In fact, some of the best facts about deserts are about the smallest deserts of the world! Ready to find out why they are so fascinating? Read on…

    The Smallest Deserts of the World

    Did you know that not all deserts are vast, sprawling landscapes with endless dunes? In fact, some of the world’s most captivating deserts are small yet packed with unique beauty and diversity.

    Today, we’re going to explore the smallest deserts of the world and learn why they are worth paying attention to. From the towering cacti of the Carcross Desert to the rolling sand dunes of the Arabian Desert, these miniature desserts offer a wealth of fascinating sights and stories.

    So sit back, grab a drink, and join us on an adventure to discover the world’s tiniest deserts.

    The smallest deserts of the world

    1. Carcross Desert

    The Carcross Desert in Yukon, Canada, is not just one of the smallest deserts of the world, it is the smallest desert of the world! It covers an area of 2.6 km2 and is considered a “cold desert” due to its low temperatures.

    The desert is home to a wide variety of plants and animals, thanks to an underground aquifer that helps sustains its vegetation. Its hot and dry climate is caused by a rain shadow effect which keeps the surrounding mountains relatively dry. This has allowed rare species of plants, such as Baikal sedge and Yukon lupine, to prosper in the desert’s arid environment.

    Moreover, it is also a popular destination for outdoor recreation. Tourists come here to take part in activities such as horseback riding and cross-country skiing. The desert has even become a popular spot for sandboarding, thanks to its unique landscape which offers plenty of slopes and jumps.

    2. Bledow Desert

    The smallest deserts of the world

    This is the second of the smallest deserts of the world. The Bledow Desert, located in southern Poland, is one of the smallest deserts of the world. It covers an area of only 32 km2. Despite its small size, the desert has a unique ecosystem that supports a variety of plant and animal species, including the European adder, the sand lizard, and the steppe grasshopper. The desert is also a breeding ground for a large population of birds, including rare species such as the little bittern.

    Despite its arid climate, the Bledow Desert has become a popular destination for outdoor recreation. In addition to horseback riding and hiking, you can enjoy cycling and sandboarding there. Thanks to its unique landscape and varied terrain, the desert offers plenty of slopes and jumps that are perfect for off-road adventure.

    The Bledow Desert isn’t just a great place to visit – it’s also an important conservation site. The desert is the habitat of many rare and endangered species, so the area has been declared a protected nature reserve.

    3. Atacama Desert

    The Atacama Desert, located in northern Chile, is one of the smallest deserts of the world. It covers an area of (1,600 km) and is known for its extreme aridity and lack of vegetation. The desert was formed due to a combination of cold ocean currents, high-pressure systems, and a rain shadow effect.

    This has resulted in very little rainfall and the absence of any permanent rivers or streams. Aside from unique geological formations, the Atacama Desert boasts an abundance of wildlife, including frogs that can live for up to 12 years without water.

    Moreover, the desert is filled with many archaeological sites, including petroglyphs and the abandoned ruins of ancient cities, hinting at a fascinating pre-Columbian past.

    4. Ladakh Desert

    The smallest deserts of the world

    Next up on this list of the smallest deserts of the world is Ladakh. Spellbinding sand dunes, snow-capped mountains, and vibrant culture – this is what the Ladakh Desert has to offer.

    This desert is situated between the Karakoram and western Himalaya ranges, along with a wide range of wildlife. The area is known for its breathtaking landscapes, rugged mountains, colourful villages, and unique culture.

    The Ladakh Desert area experiences extreme climate conditions – temperatures can reach up to minus 30°C in winter and rise up to 45°C in summer. This makes it one of the harshest deserts on earth. The sun shines almost all day long, making the environment extremely dry and unsuitable for animal life. Despite this, a few species of birds and wild animals still inhabit the area and can be seen during the spring season when plants start to bloom.

    Moreover, it is an amazing destination for adventure seekers and nature lovers alike. You can explore the vast desert, go on treks along the mountains, and experience the unique culture of this region. With a total area of 45,00 km2, the Ladakh Desert is truly one of the most remarkable places on Earth. So don’t miss out on the opportunity to explore this incredible destination.

    5. Dasht-e Lut

    Dasht-e Lut is one of the hottest, driest and smallest deserts of the world. It is located in southeastern Iran and covers an area of 51,800 square kilometres. The desert has a hot climate, and temperatures can reach up to 70°C during summer.

    Dunes rise up to 500 meters, and the desert has several salt lakes which can be seen from space. The area is known for its diverse wildlife, including gazelles, lizards, snakes, and birds. It also boasts a rich history with evidence of human habitation dating back centuries ago.

    Moreover, Dasht-e Lut is a popular tourist destination, allowing you to explore its unique landscape and observe its wildlife. For those brave enough to venture into the desert, it can be a unique and rewarding experience. You can even camp near the salt lakes to see the magnificent stars and take incredible pictures.

    If you’re looking for a unique adventure in one of the smallest deserts of the world, Dasht-e Lut should be at the top of your list. With its extreme climate and rich history, this desert is sure to give you an unforgettable experience. So get ready to explore one of the world’s smallest yet most impressive deserts.

    6. Ferlo Desert

    The Ferlo Desert, located in Senegal, covers an area of about 70,000 km2 and has a hot semi-arid climate with very little rainfall. Various animals, such as jackals, monitor lizards, and warthogs, inhabit the desert. Its sparse vegetation includes hardy grasses which have adapted to the desert’s arid conditions.

    Furthermore, the Ferlo Desert is also dotted with many archaeological sites which hint at a rich cultural history. These include ancient rock engravings and the ruins of former settlements such as villages, mosques, and forts. Visitors come to take part in activities such as camel riding, sand-dune driving, and bird-watching.

    7. Dasht-e Kavir

    The smallest deserts of the world

    The Dasht-e Kavir area is located in Iran and is home to one of the smallest deserts in the world. It covers a total of 77,000 km2 and has an average elevation of 950 meters above sea level. The desert is home to various species of wildlife, such as rodents, reptiles, birds, and small mammals.

    It is also known for its salty and alkaline soils. The Dasht-e Kavir also has a few oases of greenery, which adds to its beauty. This desert is quite hot in the summer but can be cold during winter. The Dasht-e Kavir area is one of Iran’s most beautiful deserts and a popular tourist destination.

    Moreover, you can explore the vast desert landscape, take in the stunning views of the stars at night, or even stop for an afternoon tea with locals. Whether you’re looking for a peaceful getaway or a thrilling adventure, Dasht-e Kavir is sure to provide it. So make sure to add this desert to your list of must-visit places.

    8. Mojave Desert

    The Mojave Desert, located in the Southwestern United States, is among the smallest deserts in the world. It covers an area of 81,000 km2 and is rich in various flora and fauna. The desert is known for its scorching temperatures, exceeding 40°C (104°F) during the summer months.

    Despite its arid climate, the Mojave Desert is full of a surprising variety of plants and animals. The region is inhabited by many species of cacti and desert shrubs, as well as lizards, snakes, mice, and coyotes.

    Aside from that, the desert’s unique landscape includes Joshua Tree National Park, known for its surreal rock formations. The park is also populated by various wildlife, including birds and desert tortoises. Visitors can take part in activities such as camping, hiking, bird watching, and stargazing.

    9. Columbia Basin

    The smallest deserts of the world

    The Columbia Basin, located in the US state of Washington, is also one of the smallest deserts of the world. It covers an area of about 83,000  km2 and has a semi-arid climate with hot summers and cold winters. The basin is populated by an array of plants and animals which have adapted to its dry climate. These include sagebrush, pronghorn antelope, and a variety of birds.

    Additionally, the Columbia Basin is renowned for its incredible scenery, which includes vast open plains and snow-capped mountains. It is also home to Grand Coulee Dam, the largest hydroelectric power producer in the United States. Visitors come to take part in activities such as fishing, camping, and boating.

    10. Danakil Desert    

    The Danakil Desert, located in the Afar Region of Ethiopia, is one of the harshest and smallest deserts of the world. It covers an area of 136,956 km2 and has an average atmospheric temperature of 35°C (95°F). The desert is known for its extreme temperatures, vast salt flats, and diverse wildlife.

    The landscape includes the Danakil Depression, a flat expanse of land between three active volcanoes. This area is renowned for its colorful mineral deposits and hot springs, which local inhabitants have used as bathing spots since ancient times.

    Moreover, the Danakil Desert is also filled with unique species of plants and animals, some of which are only found in this region of the world. This includes the iconic Gelada Baboon, which feeds on grasses and herbs that are adapted to survive in this harsh arid climate. The desert holds the endangered Ethiopian Wolf, which makes it home among its rugged terrain and sparse vegetation.

    11. Rangipo Desert

    The Rangipo Desert in New Zealand has a cool semi-arid climate with hot summers and cold winters. The desert is full of a variety of plants and animals which have adapted to its dry conditions, including snow tussock, red tussock, and the wrybill. Its sparse vegetation provides a unique habitat for many species of birds, such as falcons and plovers.

    Moreover, the Rangipo Desert is renowned for its rugged landscape, which includes dunes and volcanic mountains. It is also a great place to enjoy recreational activities, including skiing, snowboarding, and hiking.

    Tourists come to take part in activities such as horseback riding, mountain biking, and sandboarding. Furthermore, the desert is a popular spot for stargazing due to its dark night skies which offer unrivaled views of the stars.

    12. Accona Desert

    The smallest deserts of the world

    The Accona Desert in Italy isn’t a typical sand desert but consists of clay and sparse vegetation. Despite its size, it plays a significant role as an essential habitat for many species of plants and animals that live there. The temperatures reach up to 40 degrees Celsius during summer months, making it one of the hottest deserts in the world.

    It is a popular destination for outdoor recreation and adventure seekers as well. You can choose many activities, such as rock climbing, biking, horseback riding, sandboarding, and hiking. The area’s diverse terrain offers plenty of slopes and jumps that are perfect for adrenaline-filled activities.

    Additionally, the Accona Desert is also an important research site as it contains many fossils that give us insight into Earth’s history and past biodiversity. The Italian government protected the area, ensuring that this unique desert remains untouched and unspoiled for future generations to explore.

    The Smallest Deserts Of The World

    The world is home to several small deserts that are just as captivating as their larger counterparts. From the scorching heat of the Atacama Desert in South America to the rolling dunes of the Rangipo Desert, these mini-deserts offer a unique blend of adventure and breathtaking scenery.

    Whether you’re a seasoned traveller or just a curious nature lover, these smallest deserts of the world are worth a visit. So pack your bags, grab your sunscreen, and get ready to explore the smallest deserts of the world.

    These arid landscapes offer a window into the diverse beauty of our planet and a reminder of the delicate balance that exists between man and nature.

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